Irish whiskey

Irish whiskey can be made throughout the island of Ireland, including both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Irish whiskey must include malted barley and may include other un-malted cereal grains, resulting in four main types of whiskey. Irish whiskeys are often thought to be smooth, fruity, and triple distilled and many of them are, but this isn't the full story. The Irish are widely credited as being the first to distill whiskey, though this is strictly contested by the Scots. Irish single pot still whiskey is a mix of barley, malted and otherwise, distilled in a pot still. The un-malted barley proffers a spicy freshness that one associates with Irish whiskey. 

  • Malt: Malt Irish whiskey is made using 100% malted barley and distilled in pot stills. Single malt whiskey comes from only one distillery.
  • Pot Still: Pot Still Irish whiskey is made from a mash of a minimum 30% malted and a minimum 30% un-malted barley, with up to 5% of other cereals added, and is distilled in pot stills. Single pot still whiskey comes from only one distillery.
  • Grain: Grain Irish whiskey is made using no more than 30% malted barley in combination with other whole un-malted cereals—usually corn, wheat, or barley—and is distilled in column stills. Single grain whiskey comes from only one distillery.Blended: Blended Irish whiskey is a mixture of any two or more of the styles of malt, pot still, and grain whiskey